About your Search

20121201
20121231
STATION
CSPAN2 10
CNNW 8
CSPAN 3
CNN 1
KGO (ABC) 1
WJZ (CBS) 1
WUSA (CBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 34
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)
labor unions. >>> here in washington, republicans turn the tables on president obama. we're going to tell you what specific information they are now demanding. >>> and who was she? you're going to find out why a century's old mystery may be closer to a solution. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." we begin with today's dramatic defeat for union workers in the industrial's heartland. this was the scene as republicans pushed through right to work bills saying that they don't have to pay union dues in in order to get a job. on lookers chanted, shame on you after the vote. this is a watershed moment because michigan is the same as countless union struggles, including this 1932 march where five people died and dozens were injured when unemployed workers were attacked by police and ford motor company security guards. after decades of gains, fewer than 12% of u.s. workers now belong to unions. in michigan, it's fewer than 18%. cnn's poppy harlow is at the state capital in lansing. how did it go? >> reporter: are an historic day in michigan. a state at the heart of organized
.s. tank. he is scheduled to tape a christmas in washington special tomorrow. >>> a wrong turn leaves a california woman clinging for her life. she was on a routine hike through griffith park when she made one wrong turn. the trail slowly narrowed until the ground beneath her started to crumble. she clung to some vegetation on the trail to keep from falling off on the side. hikers along the correct trail heard her cries for help and called police. >> thank god i'm still alive. i was about to die. >> lucky woman there. crews rescued her by helicopter. she was cold and exhausted but otherwise she suffered no serious injuries. >>> they've hauled supplies to the hardest hit areas and now members are uniting for victims of superstorm sandy. tim williams has more from towson. >> it's been more than a month since superstorm sandy. relief efforts continue. >> someone -- you know, this is very small. if you get a household item, but it's new, but it's just the thought that, you know, somebody for a away is thinking about you. >> at the tow united methodis
and specified commands. they have indeed greatly increased staffs and they even have elements in washington that begin to act like lobbies. when a new problem arises, a joint task force is put together. and that makes sense. and the elements may come from more than one of the unified and specified commands. so i think another look is needed at not at the question of jointness, but at how it's carried out. and how the overhead is distributed. >> you worked in the pentagon during the vietnam war and there are those and you even mentioned certain parallels between the vietnam conflict and what we're seeing in afghanistan. right now there's a big debate going on in washington whether or not troop levels should remain high to ensure that we can train the afghans fast enough to hand over control before we leave at the end of 2014. why is that a bad idea from your standpoint? >> the real question is what kind of country is going to -- will it be possible to leave behind? and the case of vietnam, my own conclusion back in period of 1967, '68, became that the government there was unsustainable becau
last night at the christmas in washington event. december 21st, diana ross. that's it for us. thanks for watching. "erin burnett out front" starts right now. >> out front next, president obama in michigan today, selling americans on his plan for taxes. we're 22 days away from the cliff. does the plan add up? >> and a daring rescue in afghanistan claimed the life of an american navy s.e.a.l. as we prepare to go to afghanistan, we take a closer look at the american troop presence and how many americans will stay. >>> and offfield violence leads to the death of two nfl players. why the violence on the field, though, is a much more important issue. let's go "out front." >> good evening, everyone. i'm erin burnett. "outfront" tonight, cliff, slope, grand canyon. i don't know, martian cave, jupiter like storm. is the fiscal cliff really a fiscal slope. a downward spiral to something much worse. the possibility of going off the cliff is just 22 days away, and it sounds pretty ominous, but it could be a walk in the part compared with what could happen if lawmakers don't take a closer look at
absolutely right. what happens if we settle on what washington thinks is a big win? let's call it $3 trillion. >> i think $3 trillion, $4 trillion will be a sufficient number, erin, to sort of calm investment markets and to produce a real economy that is growth positive as opposed to growth negative. you know, the real problem going forward is, you know, we are going over the cliff no matter what and depends on whether we go over like will e. coyote or road run we are a parachute. that's the road runner with a ra pa ra chute and there's more taxes to raise and entitlements to cut over the ensuing years. >> that's i guess the problem. i prefer to be roadrunner with a ra pa parachute. how can washington do the deal that prevent it is country from -- to give a sense of the outcomes, could be borrowing costs skyrocket. the costs are very serious in the long term. right? >> i think they are. it involves what's known as fiscal drag to economists. basically when you raise taxes and lower entitlements, lower federal spending, that reduces economic growth and it will. it just depend on how slowly or h
the rules and pass h.r. 3137 to name the medical center in spokane, washington, as the mann-grandstaff medical center. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title of the bill. >> a bill to name the department of veterans affairs medical center in spokane, washington, as the mann-grandstaff department of veterans affairs medical center. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from florida, mr. miller, the gentleman from maine, mr. michaud, each will control 20 minutes. members, please remove conversations from the floor. members in the aisle. mr. miller: thank you, mr. speaker. i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for such time as he may consume. mr. miller: thank you very much, mr. speaker. h.r. 3197 would rename the medical center in spokane, the mann-grandstaff department of veterans affairs medical center. this legislation would recognize not one, but two -- the house is not in order. the speaker pro tempore: members, please remove conversations from the floor. remove conversation
is live in washington. >> good morning, gretchen and everybody. washington is shut down for the christmas holiday . when everybody does come back to town, the ball will be in the democrat's court because speaker boehner was unable to bring his on board. for the plan b. >> onous is on senator reid and the president to come up with a solution and present it to the house and get back to the bargaining table. >> now the president has insisted on a tax hike for the healthy but wants that at $250,000 or $400,000 and not one mill yen and even though the president scaled back his expectations for what can be accomplished some democrats said a grand bargain shouldn't be that hard to reach. >> we ought to take peeker boehner and the president's last offer and split the difference and it would be a package 2.6 trillion can couple that with 1.1 trillion and that would be close to four trillion needed to stabilize the debt and bring it down. >> the president and members was congress will return to washington wednesday or thursday and try to hammer out a deal. most likely a short-term deal to get us pa
things done in washington than playing politics. i think to recognize there's been real progress made, right the border is safer today, the immigration system is better, the two parties worked together to do that over the last few years. there are still some meaningful things that need to get done. the d.r.e.a.m. act, we have to fix the low-end and high-end visa system. the mexicans are going to do a whole boar border system. i think there will be a lot of room to work together next year to get something meaningful done. if the republicans are earnest and play it straight i think they'll get a lot of credit for working with the democrats to fix the broken immigration system and making it better. jon: getting something meaningful done, it seems like a longtime since that's happened in washington. we'll look forward to it. simon rosenberg. kate obenshane thank you much. jenna: the nato alliance warning the assad regime in syria against using chemical weapons against his own people. this is an attempt to for once and for all crush the 21-month rebellion there. nato is considering a turki
? >> matter of time. >> reporter: tory dunham, cnn, washington. >>> "cnn newsroom" continues right now with brooke baldwin. >> suzanne, thanks so much. good to be with all of you on a monday. i'm brooke baldwin. let's show you live pictures. we're watching and we're awaiting the president, packed room here, these are live pictures from redford, the redford plant, daimler's redford engine plant to be specific today this is the greater detroit area. we're expecting the president. this is an invitation only audience. we're expecting to hear themes of the economy, and middle class. couple of backdrops, just to put this in the back of your head as we continue this conversation with our chief white house correspondent who i'll bring in in a moment here. just yesterday, the president met with the speaker of the house, john boehner, to talk specifically about avoiding the fiscal cliff. we are mere weeks from that, you know, basically kicking in, first of the year. that's when everyone's taxes would be going up. that happened just yesterday. and also you have all these pro union protests happen
on the poor. there's an article in today's -- in "the washington post" on december 19, job boehner's plan b would raise taxes on the poor. really? i mean, is that how you're going to balance the budget? by sticking it to people who already are in vulnerable times? this is wrong. my friends talk about the debt, the deficit, but what they don't talk about is that we have fought two wars, in iraq and afghanistan, and we haven't paid for it. all on our credit card. we send our young men and women into harm's way and we ask them and their families to sacrifice and we do nothing. we just put the bill on our credit card. a few months ago the chairman of the budget committee, mr. ryan, says about $1.3 trillion, i think he's low-balling it, but $1.3 trillion on our debt and nobody over there says a word. they all go after programs like social security and medicare and food stamps. so, mr. speaker, i ask that we defeat the previous question and if we defeat the previous question i will offer an amendment to this rule to make in order an amendment which will allow the house to have a chance to vote on
a correspondent there as well. we'll talk to here. jessica yellin to you in washington. and, first things first, you think here michigan, you think the birth place of unions and you think about all these people who are very frustrated with this, everything i read, it seems to be pretty much a done deal, this right to work legislation, that the governor has indicated he would sign. these are the folks who helped elect the president not too long ago. should the president step in and go to bat for them? >> well, you know, the unions have been enormously supportive of the president as you point out. not only during this campaign, not only as foot stole jer sold helping get out the vote, but also financially with their dollars. the white house already expressed its support for the unions opposing right to work legislation. one of a white house official put out a statement today, matt lairic, saying in part, let me find the statement, president obama has long opposed so-called right to work laws and he continues to oppose them now. the president believes our economy is stronger when workers get good
to washington as often, and i would say, even more often than the alaska members in the house and senate. he made -- they made a point to stop by his office on a regular occasion to talk to him about what has happened in the past, what's going on today, and what they look for in the future. earlier this year, senator inouye was in alaska at my invitation, his last trip to alaska. he told them a memorable story about his support of the trans alaska oil pipeline, which was controversial when he supported it in its construction. now, senator inouye has a unique style of how to tell stories, and you got to just pay attention and listen. they're no very to the point. senator inouye told this story told by opponents of the pipe lynn that it would -- of the pipeline that it would destroy the caribou. this was what he would told over and over again. again in his last trip, he was in front of a group of people, and i was anxious as he started to tawfnlg he said, i have this story tell you. he talked about this time of controversy about the alaska north slope and the oil pipeline and the caribou and w
ii memorial in washington, d.c. this the ceremony includes remarks by the vice chairman of the joint chief. [sirens] ♪ ♪ ♪ ?eet ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ladies and gentlemen, will be delivered by lieutenant colonel. >> our help is in the name of the lord who made help and earth. the souls of the righteous are in the hand of god. those -- be destroyed but the name liveth for ever more. let us pray. almighty god, creator and sustainer, we offer to you endless of thanks thanksgiving and praise today. we reremember a time of great tyranny in our world. we remember world war ii. we also remember those who stood their ground against great tyranny. those who fought here at home and on the battle fronts to ensure that tyranny would not prevail. we thank you that in the hour of need you gave men and women the strength and resolve to stand no matter the cost. may those brave souls who still remain here with us feel today your hand of favor and strength. for those who remain with us today, receive renewed hope and awareness of our gratitude for their bravery and sacrifice. we ask for y
a wonderful monday. i'm brook baldwin at the cnn headquarters in atlanta. let's go to washington with wolf blitzer. "the situation room" begins right now. >>> brook, thanks very much. happening now, the president of the united states steps into a very intense political fight in michigan and he's definitely taking sides. we're also looking into what's behind the dramatically lower prices showing up at gas stations near you. and life-saving television. we have an amazing look at an underground tv channel run by rebel fighters in one of the most dangerous cities in the world. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> we begin with president obama getting into a new fight with republicans and it's a fight he may actually lose. this afternoon in detroit, the president blasted a package of anti-union bills. michigan republicans, governor, is ush pushing through his state's legislature. >> what we shouldn't do, i just got to say this, what we shouldn't be doing is trying to take away your rights to bargain for better wages and working conditions. >> even though the cheering went on fo
, not his washington office, we're told. but let's start with that, chris. how exactly does that happen? >> well, megyn, one supposes that the screening for interns willing to toil for some elected official is not that strict. but -- maybe they're not going to do a background check for sex offender. but, you know, immigration status, you'd think there might have been something that could have happened there that they would have done the standard employment verification, but maybe they didn't because he was just an intern. but, gosh, this is a state of affairs that new jersey republicans would really have liked to have known about in october instead of december. megyn: yeah. and i -- the business, the guy was 18 years old, we're told. so the business about the sex offender registry, i don't know, to me there's a question mark on that because if you get that while you're under age, which is what we're told is what happened with this guy, it may not be accessible via public record. but if he had to register -- so i don't know. i don't know what the story is there. however, on the illegal i
one of which in washington is almost been totally discredited because they really haven't included a broad swath of the opposition, broad enough that would have legitimacy with the opposition back in syria itself. but there are some attempts and people are thinking about these things-perhaps because of what happened in iraq in 2003. >> wonderful. one more. yes, please. >> what this likelihood that the regime will use chemical weapons and what should we or could we do if they do? >> good question. that's one of the questions that no one has an answer, understand what circumstances would the regime use chemical weapons. i suspect they don't want to use them because that would galvanize the exact international response they're trying to avoid. the don't want this type of mass blood-letting that will compel the international community to intervene much more assertively than it has. so i don't think they're going to use chemical weapons. the fear is, though, if the regime -- if the opposition gains the upper hand, if the regime is on its last legs will they want to go down in flames or
performed for the president. ♪ ♪ >> gretchen: he gained fame for the christmas in washington special. many are outraged like the mothers of the navy seals. >> performing for the president is disgusting. how do we choose those role models. he should be on a terrorist watch list. it is disgusting to me. >> gretchen: that mother's son mark allenley lee was the first navy seal killed in iraq. it is interesting when you find out things about people when they are famous. that dance craze took over the world. >> steve: i am surprised mr. psy didn't say let me explain what i was talking about. >> gretchen: he did apologize. >> steve: but nonetheless they didn't pull the plug. >> brian: kill their daughters and kill them slowlyy and smash the model of the american tank and called for our men. what do they teach in south korea schools. we are protected them. the checks we right every day to protect them on the dmz line on a daily basis to allow their democracy to flourish, to me this is the niche, niche, niche of all south koreas to feel this way. i would like to find out how americans are treated i
's an example of how just murky the divisions are in syria, later today washington will declare one of the group of rebels a foreign terrorist organization. according to federal documents the group is merely another alias or al qaeda in iraq. >>> this morning we know the name of the navy s.e.a.l. killed during a raid to rescue a kidnapped american doctor in afghanistan. the s.e.a.l. is identified as petty officer first class nicolas checque. barbara starr joins us from the pentagon with more on petty officer checque, a member of s.e.a.l. team six, the same elite unit that of course took out osama bin laden. barbara? >> good morning, ted. the military is confirming now that the body of 28-year-old nicolas checque has been returned to the united states, back to his family. no announcement about burial services for this young man, a native of pennsylvania, navy s.e.a.l. who is remembered by those who knew him at his high school, his principal, his wrestling coach, talking about the young man they knew when he was a boy back in school. >> worked hard every day, never complained. those are the things
think-tanks here in washington. my reaction for the people of south carolina is you've lost a great, strong, conservative voice, someone who has championed the conservative cause and represented our state with distinction, sincerity and -- and a great deal of passion. on a personal level, i've lost my colleague and friend. jim and i've known each other for almost 20 years now and i think we've done a pretty darned good job for south carolina. at times playing the good cop, the bad cop, but always -- always trying to work together. and what differences we've had have been sincere, and that's the word i would use about senator demint. he sincerely believes in his cause. he's a -- he sincerely believes in his causes. he's a sincere voice that people in our party look to for leadership and guidance. what he's done over the last four years to build a conservative movement, to get people involved in politics, like marco rubio, who jim helped early on in his primary i just think is going to be a great legacy. from a state point of view, we have lost one of our great champions. but he and d
is on the way has taken such an ugly tragic turn. matthew chance, cnn london. >>> to washington now, where the debate hasn't changed. taxes versus spending. deciding how much of each is what's holding up any deals on averting the fiscal cliff. negotiations are pretty much at a standstill, but if you ask house speaker john boehner, he has an idea of who's holding things up. >> there are a lot of things that are possible to put the revenue the president seeks on the table. but none of it's going to be impossible. the president insists on his position. insists on my way or the highway. >> in his weekly white house address this morning, president obama responded to boehner's remark. >> i'm willing to make more entitlement spending cuts on top of the one trillion dollars in spending cuts i signed into law last year. but if we're serious about reducing our deficit while still investing in things like education and research that are important to growing our economy, and if we're serious about protecting middle class families, then we're also going to have to ask the wealthiest americans to pay hi
to be with us. it's nice to close the doors from the rest of washington and the fiscal cliff debate for a little while and talk about fiscal challenges elsewhere. whether it's a good news or bad news, at least it gives us an opportunity to talk about something a little bit different than the news of the day in this final two weeks, i think, before hopefully congress finds an opportunity to either avoid or move or solve some of the fiscal cliff issues and fiscal challenges that we face. and thank you for dick gravich and the work of the panel and the commission he co--led. there are copies of that report that were available when you came in. it's an excellent document that i really encourage everyone to take a close read. it's filled with good analytics in terms of what's going on on the state level. to help us understand. and i fully agree, dick, with your comments earlier about the disconnect. here in washington, obviously, we're facing our own serious challenges. and sometimes those challenges seem so overwhelming that the notion of adding in the layer of complexity to think about the conseque
and washington. new reports this morning the obama administration might sue the state. recently passed initiatives decriminalized the recreational use of pot. but it is still illegal under federal law. options for the administration include preventing the states from regulating and taxing marijuana or cutting off federal cash. a new jersey town acting like the grinch trying to tear down one man's christmas spirit. the fight is over this 400-foot inflatable santa. the owner of seasonal world says there is no ordinance but he has been issued five tickets ordering him to take it down. the mayor calling it a hazard because it could blow over. >> what i do every year and i have been doing it for 12 years and they have been basically harassing me for 12 years. >> the owner of seasonal world says he has no intention of moving santa and he will take the battle to court after christmas. a fireworks display in burma goes terribly wrong when explosions go off into the crowd. [screams] >> you can hear the screams. this is a festival and hot air balloons were filled were fireworks. they were sent i
program of this kind. passenger rail and our states of oregon and washington has been in place since 1994 where we have partnered from the state level with amtrak, and in our state, burlington northern santa fe, in a collaborative approach to an incremental delivery of high and higher speed rail programs and service. so as we've been investing over the years, we see the implementation in the creation of a national vision as a very important part of what we are trying to deliver. we have a 460-mile corridor between eugene, oregon, and vancouver, british columbia. we have achieved in the last year up to 850 passengers, 50,000 passengers, and our growth is increasing year over year in the 10% rate. we have in our state invested over $480 million in capital and operations in amtrak cascades, which is what we call our program. but it wasn't until the recovery act came that we're able to make significant capital infrastructure improvements on the rail itself. sightings, double tracking, positive train control, all those amenities that will benefit high and higher speed rail, and more frequent s
the department of defense, they'll have 1600 of the collectors according to the washington post, there are already around 500 case officers at the defense intelligence agency. gathers tension for the military by 2018. they'll have about a thousand and that number will keep growing as the defense intelligence agency transitions over to the new dcs spies will be trained by the cia, but unlike the cia, the dcs is not going to be able to do anything, but gath gather intelligence, political sabotage and drone strikes continue to be cia operations and of dcs, focus on i.d.ing targets. and in recent months, those priorities have been keeping tabs on problem areas like africa, iran, north korea and even the strengthening military in china. this was signed off on by the defense secretary, leon panetta who used to be a cia chief and by general david petraeus who stepped down as cia chief after an extramarital affair was exposed last month, as for funding, the pentagon gave the dcs about 100 million dollars just to get the program started, but their overall budget is not expected to grow.
hope. dr. richard besser, abc news, washington. >> fantastic news. and it's a light drug, called azd 6765. >> remember that. >> memorize it, everybody. >> sometimes these antidepressants take weeks to kick in. if you're depressed, you have to imagine the suicide potential is high. so the weeks it takes to kick in, you know, that's important. that's a lag time where bad stuff could happen. so this is encouraging news for a lot of people who suffer with this. >> a lot of people wait until it's too late. so this could be great. >> certainly good news. we will lighten the mood when we come back. keep it right here on "world news now." ♪ >>> it's no secret that we like to eat around here. particularly one of us. so this next story is one that we're a little perplexed by. >> you like to eat. i actually like to inhale my food because i eat it so quick. but it's a growing trend that lets people inhale their food in a good way. >> reporter: attention foodies. put down your forks. >> i know that taste. >> reporter: the latest culinary craze doesn't involve food at all. >> for me, it's like g
's ecowas write the book. i have a lot practiced in washington for many years. i felt ultimately that i would put it together and piece it together. a magazine article and it expanded and it became what it is right now. always in my mind, i want young people to know. i want young people to know the this happened and so it took a while. my brother is a writer in new york and he was my editor for a while. i fired him three times, and i went back with the help of my wife, back into my first year of legal research because i had to certify, authorize this piece of nonfiction. i felt with a memoir you could just wing it you can't because once you start highlighting things you've got to get authority for it. you even have to get consent from the people that you put photographs and. i had a letter from james meredith right after i left, which is in the book itself and i wanted to put that in. my wife reminded me, we need his permission. i don't need his permission. he sent it to me that he didn't send us the world. i send a form letter to jackson mississippi and he signed it on the backside of
street journal" and another eight for "the washington post". in the course of this work, he reported on places as varied as somalia, bosnia, iraq and afghanistan, and he's been part of two teams that won the pulitzer prize. as i've gotten to know tom over these past few years, eve learned that he's that rarest of finds: a disruptive thinker whose energy and creativity combine in an interesting way. he constantly pushing us to think more nimbly and more provocatively, and that's a spirit that infuses tom's new book, "the generals." he explores generalship of good and bad. he traces the history of george marshall from world war ii, william westmoreland in vietnam to colin powell in the gulf war and to the generals who commanded in iraq from 2003 on. the generals argue that is the military's changed in the way it rewards good generalship and punishes bad and that the gulf has grown ever wider. tom's is a provocative argument and one that we will examine in some detail. joining tom is susan glaser, one of the nation's top national security journalists. susan's the editor-in-chief of fore
washington post," david is a renowned writer of fiction and nonfiction and is later during his most recent string of best-selling works of spy fiction. david is well known for his command of international affairs and his keen insight into the working of government and other factors. with these two gentlemen, we're poised for an illuminating an intriguing conversation about the world, the future and revenge of geography. bald and david, over to you. >> thank you. i think you're probably not supposed to see this as a serious moderator, but i love this book. it's embarrassing how architect it is and how many post its mouth i put not to flatter the teacher but because i really liked it. i'm going to try to walk the audience through this. we have bob walk the audience through and i would like to start with a provocative opening comment that you make. you set my reporting over three decades has convinced me that we all need to recover a sensibility of time and space that has been lost in the information age when the molders of public opinion - against the hours that will to let them talk about t
never get the "washington post" to print this point, but robert byrd when he was majority leader exercise the nuclear option four times. it goes back to the beginning of the senate whereby you set binding precedent in the senate by simple majority rules. furthermore, it was being used admittedly extraordinary, one that i think out to be used in very rare occasion, only for extenuating circumstances was done not to up in the tradition but to restore it. prior to 2003 derrick never been a judge, avril edition nominee denied confirmation deeply filibuster. never, never, never never. beginning with -- i think ultimately five judges who have the majority support, push judges who were all denied confirmation deeply filibuster though they had majority support. prior to that it'd never happen. so we are trying to restore the what it always been. you can argue that ought to be a majority. that had not been the standard pride 2003. on your question of time, you're right. biggest vulnerability is time. everything takes so long. i remember when it came to the house and i came over to the sen
obama insists he'll tackle in the second term. joining us now is emily miller from the washington times. welcome to "fox & friends" on this sunday. >> thanks for having me, mike. >> why do you think that gun control is now on the president agenda, so little was talked in the run-up to the election. >> and president obama was a strong advocate on the second amendment and as you know, illinois has the most, i believe, unconstitutional laws in the country. they don't allow any right to bear arms and before the debate he said he wanted to pursue the so-called assault weapons ban. fbi law enforcement says it doesn't reduce crime. we don't need it anymore, it bans guns that look scary and the president wants to renew that and also said that he was going to, was supporting a u.n. treaty on arms, which just hours after he was elected and at the united nations signed and that dnot rep and bear arms and the united states would be signing on to a worldwide treaty with countries like syria and iran, in which would water down our right to bare arms. >> i noticed there was a spike in gun sales after
. the clerk: washington, d.c, december 4, 2012. to the senate: under the provisions of rule 1, paragraph 3, of the standing rules of the senate, i hereby appoint the honorable christopher a. coons, a senator from the state of delaware, to perform the duties of the chai. signed: daniel k. inouye, president pro tempore. mr. reid: mr. president? the presiding officer: the majority leader. mr. reid: following leader remarks, the senate will proceed to executive session to consider the disabilities trite. the time until noon will be equally divided and controlled between the two leaders or their designees. at noon there will be a roll call vote on the resolution of advise and consent to the convention on rights of persons with disabilities. we don't do treaties often and there are requests from both --m senators on both sides of the aisle. i think the they're right, becae this is a treaty, the votes will take place from our desks today. everybody should be on notice. following the vote, mr. president, the senate will recess to allow for our weekly caucus meetings. additional votes in resolution
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)